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Great Learning Opportunities During Coronavirus (or any other time)

As a therapist, I'm always trying to think of ways to keep my clients engaged while they're learning to type. Of course, I always aim high, because I presume competence, and I am rarely disappointed. Many autistics have difficulty navigating the pages of a book or online resources independently (except for the repetitive nonsense they've learned to type in). I have found a number of apps, podcasts and websites that can be easily accessed with the help of a caregiver, and that give the learner hundreds of hours of fascinating information. Most are free, some require a monthly or yearly subscription. I encourage you to use the links to explore them on your own.


https://www.youtube.com/user/watchfreeschool/playlists

wonderopolis.com

Brookedalehouse.com

https://professorbuzzkill.com (I listen to this CONSTANTLY in my car, walking, hiking, making dinner, etc.)

coursera.org

thegreatcourses.com

superteacherworksheets.com

stories.audible.com (Audible is usually pricey, but they are offering a number of books for free during the pandemic- jump on it NOW to take advantage of it!)

ixl.com

wonderstrucktv.com (this only works on computers, not tablets)

Brain Pop (app)

TapTypin (app) (I like this because it helps develop hand-eye coordination while fostering independence)


I'm sure there are plenty more out there. If you find something that you like, email me or add to the comment section below. Happy learning!!




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